Christian men dating jewish women

December, 2002 Reprinted with permission from the Forward.

But as I fell in love with her, she fell in love with me—and with my Judaism as well.

In high school, this decision proved to be mostly moot. I tried not to follow up on them at first, but I was frustrated and lonely and had finite willpower.

After one date, though, I would beat myself up mentally for breaking my rule, and I’d avoid making second dates.

April, 2008 A recent landmark study of Americans' religious behavior confirmed what many observers of intermarriage have often suggested, but never proven: when Jews intermarry, they disproportionately marry Catholics. "This is something that everyone has known for years," says Rabbi Arthur Blecher, who noted the trend in last year's The New American Judaism: The Way Forward on Challenging Issues from Intermarriage to Jewish Identity. "Jews are concentrated in the Northeast, and so are Catholics," he says. I can't say that the Jews have any special affection for people who are Catholic." Melissa and Karl Simon of Reston, Va., are a case in point. Even with different religious backgrounds, "I think our families had the same values," says Melissa Simon.

Religion Landscape Survey conducted by the Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life, 39% of intermarried Jews are married to Catholics, even though Protestants outnumber Catholics in the U. Overall, slightly less than a third of all married Jews are intermarried. It is not as though the Jews are saying 'Gee, I would like to marry a Catholic…'" While no one has formally studied the question, sociologist Steven Cohen, a professor at New York's Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, boils the phenomenon down to one word: geography.

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  1. The four tables give the most commonly accepted dates or ranges of dates for the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible, the Deuterocanonical books (included in Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox bibles but not in the Hebrew and Protestant bibles), and the New Testament, including, where possible, hypotheses about their formation-history. Table II treats the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible books, grouped according to the divisions of the Hebrew Bible with occasional reference to scholarly divisions. Table IV gives the books of the New Testament, including the earliest preserved fragments for each.